Irving Berlin's Holiday Inn Tickets

Irving Berlin's heartwarming and madcap holiday musical comes to the stage! Join Jim, Ted, Lila, and Linda in this lively and romantic tale of show business, dreams-come-true, and crossed wires! With hit song after hit song, Holiday Inn is an all-singing, all-dancing festive delight!

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LOCAL EVENTS

LOCATION Ashburn, VA

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Dec
6
Irving Berlin's Holiday Inn

Friday - 07:30 pm - Theatre Arlington - Arlington, TX

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Dec
7
Irving Berlin's Holiday Inn

Saturday - 07:30 pm - Theatre Arlington - Arlington, TX

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Dec
8
Irving Berlin's Holiday Inn

Sunday - 02:00 pm - Theatre Arlington - Arlington, TX

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Dec
12
Irving Berlin's Holiday Inn

Thursday - 07:30 pm - Theatre Arlington - Arlington, TX

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Dec
13
Irving Berlin's Holiday Inn

Friday - 07:30 pm - Theatre Arlington - Arlington, TX

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Dec
14
Irving Berlin's Holiday Inn

Saturday - 07:30 pm - Theatre Arlington - Arlington, TX

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Dec
15
Irving Berlin's Holiday Inn

Sunday - 02:00 pm - Theatre Arlington - Arlington, TX

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Dec
19
Irving Berlin's Holiday Inn

Thursday - 07:30 pm - Theatre Arlington - Arlington, TX

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Dec
20
Irving Berlin's Holiday Inn

Friday - 07:30 pm - Theatre Arlington - Arlington, TX

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Dec
21
Irving Berlin's Holiday Inn

Saturday - 07:30 pm - Theatre Arlington - Arlington, TX

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Dec
22
Irving Berlin's Holiday Inn

Sunday - 02:00 pm - Theatre Arlington - Arlington, TX

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?ABOUT HOLIDAY INN

Based on the Paramount Pictures 1942 film of the same name, which starred Bing Crosby and Fred Astaire, Holiday Inn is a musical with a libretto by Gordon Greenberg and Chad Hodge, and music and lyrics by Irving Berlin. The musical premiered at the Goodspeed Opera House in East Haddam, Connecticut in 2014 and opened on Broadway in 2016.

?SYNOPSIS

It’s August 1949 and in a nightclub in Yonkers, New York City, song-and-dance trio Jim Hardy, Ted Hanover, and Lila Dixon have just performed the final number of their show for the night. Backstage, Jim proposes to Lila, who gladly accepts. However, when Jim mentions that he has bought a farmhouse in Connecticut for them to settle down in together, Lila is less enthused, hesitant about giving up performing. The pair are interrupted by Ted and their manager, Danny, who are excited to announce that the trio has been booked for a six-week run at the Pump Room in Chicago. Jim attempts to explain his plans to whisk Lila away to the farmhouse and refuses the gig, but Lila accepts and says that she’ll go to Chicago with Ted and then meet Jim later at the farm, where he will go to sign the papers.

Having arrived in Connecticut and begun to unpack, Jim finds the farm in disrepair and is soon visited by a local boy, Charlie, who presents him with a bill for back taxes on behalf of the bank. He’s then visited by Linda Mason, a plucky young schoolteacher and aspiring performer who used to live on the farm. Linda’s family had previously owned the farm and when the bank foreclosed on the property, she was forced to leave some things behind. Jim gives her the go-ahead to pick them up and as she takes her things out of storage, the pair bond over their shared sense of loneliness, love of the simple life, and hopes to enter a new phase of life. Despite his clear attraction to Linda, Jim finds that he is missing Lila and is keen to prepare the farmhouse for her, so Linda introduces him to the farm’s handy-woman Louise. Meanwhile, Ted and Lila’s run is a roaring success – so much so that Lila has been putting off visiting Jim in Connecticut. When she finally arrives, she calls off the engagement and leaves again to continue to tour with Ted.

By the time Thanksgiving rolls around, Ted and Lila are performing in Las Vegas and Jim and Linda find themselves each alone, eating Thanksgiving dinner by themselves. On Christmas Eve, Jim and Louise decorate the farmhouse together. Struck by the poignancy of decorating such a large house with no visitors, Louise decides to cheer Jim up and surprise him by inviting several of his old show business friends to spend the holidays on the farm. They throw a joyful party that impresses Linda and reminds Jim how much he misses performing. Suddenly, inspiration strikes and he decides to open the farmhouse up in the holidays each year as a nightclub and inn, where he will produce shows, bringing in money and allowing him to perform whilst enjoying the quiet life for the rest of the year. Jim’s performer guests are enamored with the idea and agree to perform with him when he opens it for the first time in just one week’s time on New Year’s Eve. Jim then serenades Linda with "White Christmas" - the type of song that he plans to perform at his new Holiday Inn.

On New Year’s Eve, the Holiday Inn enjoys a triumphant opening filled with song, dancing, and merriment. Everything is going swimmingly until a drunken Ted crashes the show and steals a dance with Linda. Despite Ted’s inebriation, he and Linda have clear chemistry together when they dance. At the end of the number, Ted gets carried away and kisses Linda, which is enough to earn him a furious punch from Jim, who knocks him out. Upset, Linda runs away as the clock strikes midnight.

Ted awakens, confused, hungover, and with little memory of the night before, in Louise’s bedroom. He explains to Jim and Louise that Lila abandoned their act to marry a millionaire in Texas, which was the cause of his drinking the night before. As he recalls the events that led him to the farm, he remembers dancing with a woman (although cannot remember who) and decides that he must have her as his new dance partner. Jim, worried that Ted may make moves on Linda, keeps quiet about this “mystery girl” and is relieved when Ted leaves for New York, vowing to dance with every woman he meets until he finds her. After Ted has left, Jim apologizes to Linda for his and Ted’s behavior and, when she forgives him, plucks up the courage to ask her on a date, which she accepts.

As Valentine’s Day arrives, Ted is in New York preparing for a special show, but Danny insists that he returns to the Holiday Inn to find his perfect dance partner, canceling the event. In Connecticut, Jim has realized that he is in love with Linda. Just as he is expressing his love to her in a song, Ted walks in and recognizes her as the woman he danced with. Interrupting them, he asks Linda to dance with him so he can confirm his suspicions, and when she reluctantly agrees and they dance, it becomes apparent that he was correct. Thrilled that he has found her at last, Ted decides that he must stay at the Holiday Inn and work on a new act with her, to be performed on George Washington’s birthday. Jim’s protestations fall on deaf ears and he decides to make space for them in the show, which they perform together as a roaring success, despite Jim’s attempts to sabotage them when they get too close. Jim apologizes for his actions, but can’t keep himself from trying to sabotage them again at an Easter performance the following month. Tired of Jim’s meddling, Ted asks Danny to come up with a plan to stop him from interfering. It just so happens that two Hollywood producers are keen for Ted and Linda to star in a movie together and Ted and Danny hatch a scheme to bring them to the Holiday Inn for their Fourth of July show. Overhearing their plans, Louise decides to take matters into her own hands and tracks down Lila, asking her to come to the inn with the hope that she can somehow get her to replace Linda in the show.

As the Independence Day show fast approaches, Linda is in final rehearsal but is caught unawares by Louise, who locks her in the barn to prevent her from performing. Covering for his missing partner, Ted breaks out a solo tap dance number that includes fireworks to try and impress the producers. Lila arrives and mistakenly walks into the barn whilst looking for the stage door. She explains to Linda that the Texan she left Ted to marry owes millions of dollars, rather than owning millions and so she came back to perform for the producers. Linda is furious, presuming that Jim is to blame for Lila’s arrival, and locks Lila in the barn, making it on stage in time to perform the closing number with Ted. When the show is over, Linda challenges Jim, but when it becomes clear that he had no idea about either the producers or Lila’s return, Louise confesses that she was the one who planned the sabotage. However, it was to no avail, as Danny excitedly tells them that the producers loved the show and want to cast the pair in a movie about the Holiday Inn with Jim as a songwriter and consultant. Brokenhearted that he is losing his stable life to Hollywood once more, Jim flatly refuses to go and tells Linda to leave with Ted. Hurt by his rejection, she does exactly that.

Dismayed and short on headliners, Jim cancels any upcoming Holiday Inn shows and spends another Thanksgiving alone with Louise. Unable to stand her friend being so dour, she surprises him with a ticket to Hollywood and convinces him to go and find Linda to bring her home. On the Holiday Inn movie set, Linda is having an awful time recreating the story of her life with Jim, and in a scene with Ted where they are supposed to sing "White Christmas" together, she cannot stop crying. As she sings, Jim walks in and begins singing with her. She runs into his arms, delighted to see him and halting production. He proposes to her, which she accepts, quitting the movie. As they are early in production, Lila takes her place, placating Danny. Linda and Jim return to Connecticut and marry on the farm, with Ted as best man, vowing to reopen performances at the Holiday Inn.

REVIEWS

"The 1942 film has gotten a complete and first-class stage redo [...] turning this shaky fixer-upper into prime property. [...] Director Gordon Greenberg and co-writer Chad Hodge have significantly rethought, reshaped and revitalized the script, giving the show more heart, a modern sensibility and a joyful spirit. Engaging performances, dynamic dancing and a lively orchestra make it the feel-good show of the fall." - Variety

"An endorphin assault, inducing warm-bath pleasure like no other show since 42nd Street. The dancing is spectacular, the singing sublime, the visuals are ingenious" – Deadline

"[A] trip back to sheer old-fashioned good-time entertainment – especially given Denis Jones's very lively choreography and the excellent designers and performers ... particularly ... the first act's jump rope routines in "Shakin' the Blues Away." - CurtainUp

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